In a split second


Lian Nami Buan - The one that got away

Finally warmed up to Katy Perry’s “The one that got away.”

I still think it’s sappy but this world is made of sappy;

and anyone who’s ever liked anyone can say they get it.

1 year ago / Played 9 times
fashionfever:

I’m kind of in desperate need for it to get cold just so I can wear a million of my scarves.
Jasper Knit Scarf - Mauve

fashionfever:

I’m kind of in desperate need for it to get cold just so I can wear a million of my scarves.

Jasper Knit Scarf - Mauve

via fashionfever / 1 year ago / 310 notes /
futurejournalismproject:

infoneer-pulse:

A Real-Time Map of Global Cyberattacks

Cyberattacks are happening constantly across the globe, and now you can see what that looks in real-time with [this map by the Honeynet Project](http://map.honeycloud.net/) that shows so many attacks, it looks and feels like it’s straight out of an apocalyptic war movie.
Each red dot that pops up when you go to the map represents an attack on a computer. Yellow dots represent honeypots, or systems set up to record incoming attacks. The black box on the bottom says where each attack is coming from as they come in. The data comes from the members of Honeynet Project’s network of honeypot sensors that choose to publish the attacks. Not all of members of the project, which has more than 40 chapters around the world, chose to push data, which is why more red dots show up in Europe. 

» via The Atlantic

FJP: You sank my battleship?

futurejournalismproject:

infoneer-pulse:

A Real-Time Map of Global Cyberattacks

Cyberattacks are happening constantly across the globe, and now you can see what that looks in real-time with [this map by the Honeynet Project](http://map.honeycloud.net/) that shows so many attacks, it looks and feels like it’s straight out of an apocalyptic war movie.

Each red dot that pops up when you go to the map represents an attack on a computer. Yellow dots represent honeypots, or systems set up to record incoming attacks. The black box on the bottom says where each attack is coming from as they come in. The data comes from the members of Honeynet Project’s network of honeypot sensors that choose to publish the attacks. Not all of members of the project, which has more than 40 chapters around the world, chose to push data, which is why more red dots show up in Europe. 

» via The Atlantic

FJP: You sank my battleship?

theatlantic:

Happy Birthday Occupy! Income Inequality Is Still Getting Worse.

Occupy Wall Street may well have been the first global protest movement to rally around a statistic cribbed from an economics paper. So to mark its one year anniversary today, I thought I’d break out some of the latest numbers tracking U.S. inequality, courtesy of this month’s Census Bureau recent report on income, poverty, and health insurance coverage. 
From 2010 to 2011, the top 5 percent of U.S. households upped their share of the country’s income by 5.3 percent. The top 20 percent got a 1.6 percent bump. And while the country’s poorest saw their piece of the pie grow by a smidgen, the middle classes lost ground.

Read more. [Image: Jordan Weissmann]

theatlantic:

Happy Birthday Occupy! Income Inequality Is Still Getting Worse.

Occupy Wall Street may well have been the first global protest movement to rally around a statistic cribbed from an economics paper. So to mark its one year anniversary today, I thought I’d break out some of the latest numbers tracking U.S. inequality, courtesy of this month’s Census Bureau recent report on income, poverty, and health insurance coverage. 

From 2010 to 2011, the top 5 percent of U.S. households upped their share of the country’s income by 5.3 percent. The top 20 percent got a 1.6 percent bump. And while the country’s poorest saw their piece of the pie grow by a smidgen, the middle classes lost ground.

Read more. [Image: Jordan Weissmann]

via theatlantic / 1 year ago / 176 notes /
Our newsroom. 
Taken in the evening of Thursday by co-staffer Nikko Quiogue. People of 24 Oras, State of the Nation with Jessica Soho and Saksi at work.
Had Nikko attempted to take this photo a day after, he wouldn’t have been able to get a calm shot. That was Friday, when the 7.6 quake hit Samar and people were either running, shouting on their feet or both.

Our newsroom. 

Taken in the evening of Thursday by co-staffer Nikko Quiogue. People of 24 Oras, State of the Nation with Jessica Soho and Saksi at work.

Had Nikko attempted to take this photo a day after, he wouldn’t have been able to get a calm shot. That was Friday, when the 7.6 quake hit Samar and people were either running, shouting on their feet or both.

25 Things To Do Before You Turn 25

1. Make peace with your parents. Whether you finally recognize that they actually have your best interests in mind or you forgive them for being flawed human beings, you can’t happily enter adulthood with that familial brand of resentment.

2. Kiss someone you think is out of your league; kiss models and med students and entrepreneurs with part-time lives in Dubai and don’t worry about if they’re going to call you afterward.

3. Minimize your passivity.

4. Work a service job to gain some understanding of how tipping works, how to keep your cool around assholes, how a few kind words can change someone’s day.

5. Recognize freedom as a 5:30 a.m. trip to the diner with a bunch of strangers you’ve just met.

6. Try not to beat yourself up over having obtained a ‘useless’ Bachelor’s Degree. Debt is hell, and things didn’t pan out quite like you expected, but you did get to go to college, and having a degree isn’t the worst thing in the world to have. We will figure this mess out, I think, probably; the point is you’re not worth less just because there hasn’t been an immediate pay off for going to school. Be patient, work with what you have, and remember that a lot of us are in this together.

7. If you’re employed in any capacity, open a savings account. You never know when you might be unemployed or in desperate need of getting away for a few days. Even $10 a week is $520 more a year than you would’ve had otherwise.

8. Make a habit of going outside, enjoying the light, relearning your friends, forgetting the internet.

9. Go on a 4-day, brunch-fueled bender.

10. Start a relationship with your crush by telling them that you want them. Directly. Like, look them in the face and say it to them. Say, I want you. I want to be with you.

11. Learn to say ‘no’ — to yourself. Don’t keep wearing high heels if you hate them; don’t keep smoking if you’re disgusted by the way you smell the morning after; stop wasting entire days on your couch if you’re going to complain about missing the sun.

12. Take time to revisit the places that made you who you are: the apartment you grew up in, your middle school, your hometown. These places may or may not be here forever; you definitely won’t be.

13. Find a hobby that makes being alone feel lovely and empowering and like something to look forward to.

14. Think you know yourself until you meet someone better than you.

15. Forget who you are, what your priorities are, and how a person should be.

16. Identify your fears and instead of letting them dictate your every move, find and talk to people who have overcome them. Don’t settle for experiencing .000002% of what the world has to offer because you’re afraid of getting on a plane.

17. Make a habit of cleaning up and letting go. Just because it fit at one point doesn’t mean you need to keep it forever — whether ‘it’ is your favorite pair of pants or your ex.

18. Stop hating yourself.

19. Go out and watch that movie, read that book, listen to that band you already lied about watching, reading, listening to.

20. Take advantage of health insurance while you have it.

21. Make a habit of telling people how you feel, whether it means writing a gushing fan-girl email to someone whose work you love or telling your boss why you deserve a raise.

22. Date someone who says, “I love you” first.

23. Leave the country under the premise of “finding yourself.” This will be unsuccessful. Places do not change people. Instead, do a lot of solo drinking, read a lot of books, have sex in dirty hostels, and come home when you start to miss it.

24. Suck it up and buy a Macbook Pro.

25. Quit that job that’s making you miserable, end the relationship that makes you act like a lunatic, lose the friend whose sole purpose in life is making you feel like you’re perpetually on the verge of vomiting. You’re young, you’re resilient, there are other jobs and relationships and friends if you’re patient and open.


- January Nelson (via tyleroakley)

(Source: lydiamichelle)

via dramatistwriter / 2 years ago / 352,204 notes /

We are the Media Elite

Good evening, I’m Will McAvoy, this is News Night and that was a clip of Richard Clark, former Counter-Terrorism Chief to George W. Bush, testifying before Congress on March 24th, 2004.

Americans liked that moment. I like that moment. Adults should hold themselves accountable for failure. And so tonight I begin this newscast by joining Mr. Clark in apologizing to the American people for our failure. The failure of this program during the time I’ve been in charge of it to successfully inform the American electorate.

Let me be clear. That I don’t apologize in behalf of all Broadcast Journalists nor do all Broadcast Journalists owe an apology. I speak for myself. I was an accomplice to a slow and repeated and unacknowledged and unamended train wreck of failures that have brought us to now. I’m a leader in an industry that miscalled election results, hyped up terror scares, ginned up controversy and failed to report on tectonic shifts in our country, from the collapse of the financial system to the truths about how strong we are to the dangers we actually face. I’m a leader in an industry that misdirected your attention with the dexterity of Harry Houdini, while sending hundreds of thousands of our bravest young men and women off to war without due diligence.

The reason we failed isn’t a mystery – we took a dive for the ratings.

In the infancy of mass communication, the Columbus and Magellan of broadcast journalism, William Paley and David Sarnoff, went down to Washington to cut a deal with Congress. Congress would allow the fledgling networks free use of taxpayer-owned airwaves in exchange for one public service. That public service would be one hour of airtime set aside every night for informational broadcasting, or what we now call the evening news.

Congress, unable to anticipate the enormous capacity television would have to deliver consumers to advertisers, failed to include in its deal the one requirement that would have changed our national discourse immeasurably for the better – Congress forgot to add that under no circumstances could there be paid advertising during informational broadcasting. They forgot to say the taxpayers will give you the airwaves for free and for 23 hours a day, you should make a profit, but for one hour a night, you work for us.

And now those network newscasts, anchored through history by honest-to-God newsmen with names like Murrow and Reasoner and Huntley and Brinkley and Buckley and Cronkite and Rather and Russert…now, they have to compete with the likes of me, a cable anchor who’s in the exact same business as the producers of “Jersey Shore.”

And that business was good to us. But News Night is quitting that business right now. It might come as a surprise to you that some of history’s greatest American journalists are working right now. Exceptional minds with years of experience and an unshakable devotion to reporting the news. But these voices are a small minority now and they don’t stand a chance against the circus when the circus comes to town. They’re over matched. I’m quitting the circus, switching teams. I’m going with the guys who are getting creamed. I’m moved. They still think they can win and I hope they can teach me a thing or two.

From this moment on, we’ll be deciding what goes on our air and how it’s presented to you based on the simple truth that nothing is more important to a democracy than a well-informed electorate. We’ll endeavor to put information in a broader context because we know that very little news is born at the moment it comes across our wire.

We’ll be the champion of facts and the mortal enemy of innuendo, speculation, hyperbole and nonsense. We’re not waiters in a restaurant, serving you the stories you asked for, just the way you like them prepared. Nor are we computers, dispensing only the facts because news is only useful in the context of humanity. I’ll make no effort to subdue my personal opinions. I will make every effort to expose you to informed opinions that are different from my own.

You may ask who are we to make these decisions. We are MacKenzie McHale and myself. Ms. McHale is our executive producer. She marshals the resources of over 100 reporters, producers, analysts and technicians and her credentials are readily available. I’m News Night’s managing editor and make the final decision on everything seen and heard on this program.

Who are we to make these decisions? We are the media elite.

Full transcript of Will McAvoy’s (Jeff Daniel) apology over the fictional ACN Cable news show “News Night” in HBO’s The Newsroom.

I wish not even that real media outfits apologize but just that real media outfits realize why they should apologize. Just a little teeny bit.

#ScenesFromTheNewsroom

Previewing materials / cheat sheets for SOT timecodes / writing for rundown / remote requirements and final checking of scripts featuring the reporter, the head writer, writers, program coordinator and the executive producer of State of the Nation with Jessica Soho. (Activities, names in order as photos appear)

This is our show. And we try to do it right.

2 years ago / 1 note /
Difficult…very difficult.

Difficult…very difficult.

Dundee, Scotland

2 years ago / 1 note /
 
Next »



Page 1 of 189
Theme by maggie. Runs on Tumblr.